Mary (Anderson) Bourbannais           Antoine Bourbannais   

John Charles Anderson

An advertisement in the 1844 Peoria city directory slates, "Plow Manufactory: The subscribers respectfully announce to the Citizens of Peoria and the adjoining counties, that they are constantly engaged in mak.ing of various sizes and most approved models, which they beheve will bear a favorable comparison with any manufactured in the western country. For strength, durability, lightness of draft, and perfect finish in workmanship, they are unequaled, and are warranted to scour in any soil, after receiving a soil polish. We shall spare no effort to please those who may favor us with a call, and if we have not the article they may wish, we can get it up at short notice." Tobey &: Anderson, Peoria; May 1, 1844. By the time of John Anderson's death, many Potawatomi families had been removed to near Council Bluffs, Iowa as a result of the U.S. Government's removal policy of the 1820's and 30's. The government established an agency at Council Bluffs in April, 1837 and by August of that year approximately 1,450 persons, led by Billy Caldwell, had resettled in Iowa. 

Antoine and Archange Ouilmette came to Council Bluffs in 1838 from Chicago and both died there; Archange in 1840 and Antoine in 1841. ​Their son, Joseph lived at Council Bluffs until 1844 when he moved again to Maple Hill, Kansas. Their daughter, Archange (Wilmette) Tremblay also lived at Council Bluffs for a time as did the widow Mary (Trombly) Anderson and the three Anderson children. Mary died at Council Bluffs in 1848. Margaret LaFramboise, daughter of Claude and Shawwenoquah, also lived in Iowa and had at least four of her seven children there (Elizabeth, Davis, Thomas and Julia). Margaret LaFramboise earlier had married John Hardin, of Missouri, on September 8, 1842. John Hardin was born October 17, 1815 and was the second child of Davis Hardin (born April 5, 1784) and Elizabeth Simpson (born October 17, 1788). The other children of John and Elizabeth (Simpson) Hardin were: Elizabeth Williams (born 1812), Richard Simpson (born 1817), John Allen (born 1819), Henrietta Harris (born 1821), Rosannah Jane (born 1825) and Martin Davis (born 1826).John and Margaret (LaFramboise) Hardin lived at Council Bluffs until about 1860 when they moved to the Silver Lake, Kansas area. 

​Some other members of Hardin families who were early residents of the area stayed in Council Bluffs after most of the tribe had been removed again to Kansas. One of them, William D. Hardin, born October, 1856, in Council Bluffs and educated there, eventually became the City Assessor in 1890.  

In 1896 he wrote to his cousin Davis Hardin in Oklahoma Territory:  
Council Bluffs, Iowa, Jan 14 1896
Mr. Davis Hardin Shawnee Okla.
Dear Sir: I am going to try to visit you the last of this or 1st of next month - is there any law against shooting Quail in your country in January or Feb? Was down in Missouri about two weeks ago to see Uncle Dick (your father’s brother). He is past 81 and in good health.
Yours Truly, 
W.O. Hardin

The agency at Council Bluffs, Iowa was eventually closed in 1848. Earlier, in 1846, a treaty was effected resulting in a new reservation for the tribe near Silver Lake, Kansas. In the spring of 1847, Joseph LaFramboise (born 1798) was among the first of a group to remove to the Silver Lake, Kansas area. Joseph and his wife, Therese, had a large family and built a house on the highest point of ground on the east bank of Silver Lake. In one article, Joseph reportedly had two wives and eighteen children. As a result of previous treaties with the U.S. he also received annual annuities for himself and his children. One of his daughters, Monique, recalled: "We had plenty of money and plenty of fun."

​The Anderson children arrived at Silver Lake, Kansas in about 1851, making the trip from Council Bluffs, Iowa with their grandmother, Archange (Wilmette) Trombly. Shortly thereafter, John was sent to school in Missouri, to a place about three miles from Westport, Missouri. He had first attended a district school in the neighborhood of the reservation at Council Bluffs. John remained at school in Missouri for about five years then left to learn the blacksmith trade at Westport. He worked there for about two-and-a-half years for board and a few new clothes, then eventually went back to Silver Lake in about 1858 and in 1862 married Elizabeth Hardin. John's brother Peter later married Elizabeth's sister Julia (age 16) on July 3, 1871 at Shawnee County, Kansas, shortly before coming to Indian Territory. Later, John was involved in tribal business and also worked as a blacksmith in Kansas. 

Elizabeth (Anderson) Kremenak (granddaughter of John Anderson) recalls spending many hours listening to her grandpa tell of his experiences as a boy. During the Civil War he was a blacksmith and took care of the mules that pulled the cannons for the military. He also told her about how hard it was to get food for the mules and the Army during the war.

In 1854, Madore B. Beaubien settled at Silver Lake and worked as a merchant and trader there. He was married to Therese Hardin LaFramboise (daughter of Joseph LaFramboise) on June 1, 1854. 1t was in the Baptist Mission. Therese had earlier been married to Allen Hardin and still earlier, David Watkins of Chicago. At her Chicago wedding, the following account was given: ''The ceremony was performed by Rev. Isaac W. Hallam, pastor of the St. James Episcopal Church of this city. Everything was high-toned, well worthy of an Indian chief's daughter. The house was of no use, as it was full and surrounded with people. This wedding made a strong impression on my mind, as it was the first time I ever saw the Indian war-dance. Some of the guests not only had their tomahawks and scalping knives, bows and arrows, but a few of them had real scalps which they pretended they had taken in battle.  The various Indians had their faces decorated with all the favorite pictures of the Indians, and some of our young white men and ladies played the part of the Indians so well that it was difficult to distinguish them from real ones."

​In Kansas, the California and Oregon Trail joined the military road from Ft. Leavenworth just a little east of Silver Lake, passing through as great highway north of the Kansas River, making this location particularly desirable. Also, according to Potawatomi historian, Dr. R. David Edmunds, another reason that this area was so desirable was that the Potawatomi women were widely known as "knockouts", i.e. beautiful.

There was a lot of travel through this area and several ferries on the Kaw or Kansas River were operated by members of the Agee family: John, Joseph and Lewis. The Kennedy family was also prominent in the Silver Lake area and at nearby Uniontown where one of the Kennedy's, along with Mr. Freeman, built a ferryboat in 1852 that was operated by Sidney W. Smith. Joseph Wilmette operated a ferry in the area for some time and also freighted wheat to Topeka. 

Roy Charles Wilmette (grandson of Joseph Wilmette) tells a story of how, when on the way home from freighting in western Kansas, Joseph and three other men were caught in a blizzard. Eventually forced to stop, Joseph said he knew of an Indian camp where they could seek shelter, but only one of the men was willing to go with him. Climbing over a bank, Joseph yelled out and an Indian answered, leading them to the camp. After a day or so the two men left the camp and returned to their wagons only to find that the two men left behind had burned the wagons for warmth - and had frozen to death in spite of their efforts.

By 1860, many of the tribal members desired that the thirty square mile reservation in Kansas be allotted to members of the tribe. Madore B. Beaubien was an interpreter and one of six commissioners appointed by the tribe and approved by the U.S. Government. Under two treaties dictated by railroad interests, the reservation was divided up. The "Mission Indians" around St. Mary's took their share in individual allotments and later become known as the "Citizen Band." The "Prairie Band" was allowed a nine mile square tract in the northeast comer of the old reservation. However, the allotment procedure was riddled with fraud and graft against the tribe and by the end of the 1860's most of the Potawatomi around St. Mary's had been cheated out of their farms. In an 1863 government report on the allotments from Special Commissioners Edward Wolcoll and W. W. Ross to Hon. Wm. P. Dole, the Commissioners stated:  "After the allotments were completed we delayed, in pursuance of verbal instructions from you, making our report, in order to give an opportunity to as many as wished to do so, to give up their allotments and remove to Indian Country, in accordance with the terms of a treaty which the Agent of this tribe is now endeavoring to negotiate with them. Should the effort to negotiate a treaty with this tribe, by which a portion of them agree to remove to the Indian Country, be successful, it is not doubted by us that a considerable number of those who have taken lands in severalty will give up their allotments and go with their brethren. With this view, it seems to us advisable to defer for a time, the issuing of certificates for the allotments herewith reported."

In all, about 1,400 persons were allotted lands in Kansas in 1863. The Andersons, Hardins, Wilmettes, LaFromboises and Bourbonnais were among the families allotted lands in Kansas. Some of those named with special notations included Me-yain-co (chief), We-we-say (chief), Joseph LaFramboise (chief), George L. Young (headman), John F. Tipton (headman) and Ma-zhe (chief).

By 1871 the first of the Potawatomi families had arrived in Indian Territory. Among the first families were the three Andersons and their spouses; Pete and Julia (Hardin) Anderson, John and Elizabeth (Hardin) Anderson and Antoine and Mary (Anderson) Bourbonnais. In Indian Territory, Mary and her husband worked closely with Rev. Franklin Elliot of the Society of Friends at the Shawnee Mission and Mary was the first Sunday School Superintendent in the county, from 1873 until 1900. Antoine, along with George Pettifer, served as Trustee for the Clardyville School. 

The Bourbonnais had five children:  Aaron F. (born about 1862, Kansas), John A., Leve A., Ozella (wife of W. F. Jenks) and Amelia Hudson. Other early inhabitants of the new reservation included Jacob and Sophia (Vieux) Johnson. Jacob and Sophia were married on June 9, 1856 at Indianola, Shawnee County, Kansas. They built a two room log cabin at Pleasant Prairie near the present location of Wanelle Cemetery. Jacob and Sophia had a daughter, Rachel, who married John Wall. Rachel and John's daughter, Sadie, later married David (?) Hardin. Joshua E. Clardy, merchant, was also among the first seven families to arrive at Indian Territory, however, he returned to Kansas in 1876.

One story states that in the spring of 1876, an Indian outlaw attempted to rob Clardy at his store, located south of present Wanelle. Clardy resisted, and a fierce battle ensued. During the fight, Clardy finally killed his antagonist with his hunting knife, although suffering multiple wounds to himself from a similar weapon. Shortly thereafter, he returned to Kansas to become a newspaperman and in 1879 was the owner of the "Pottawatomi Chief" at St. Mary's Kansas and the "Kansas Agriculturist" at Wamego, Kansas. 

Davis Harden arrived in Indian Territory after 1875 and along with Pete and John Anderson, Thomas Hardin and many others, was active in Potawatomi business mailers. As tribal secretary for some time, Davis Hardin was involved in matters including legal claims against the government which were apparently being pursued in 1889 according to a deposition stating: "...Alexander B. Peltier and Davis Hardin who, being first duly sworn according to law, disposes and says, each for himself, that they are the identical persons who by authority of a Council of the Citizen Band Potawatomie Indians held October 23, 1889, executed an instrument of writing authorizing and empowering Anthony F. Navarre to present and prosecute certain claims of said Indians against the Government of the United States, as therein set forth, that the time agreed upon for said instrument of writing to run was five years from the date thereof, and that it was so set out therein before the same was signed executed and acknowledged by us."

Also in 1889, Charles D. Anderson (born 1863, Kansas) who was the oldest son of John and Elizabeth, married Anna Marie Mueller on July 1, 1889 at the home of his parents in Shawnee. Anna Marie Mueller was the daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth (Lang) Mueller and was born in Gieslitz, Germany on February 25. 1870. In 1883 she came to America with a family by the name of Steuber and they made their home in Wichita, Kansas. She stayed with the Steuber family for some time and later in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Greifenstein of Wichita. 

Charles and Anna Marie (Mueller) Anderson eventually had seven children, all born near Shawnee:
Fred Charles (1890 my grandfather), Herman Edward (1892), Osie (1894), Charles Henry (1897), Joseph John (1901), Marie Louise (1904) and Sophie Esther (1907).

​In 1891, lands were allotted in Oklahoma to members of the tribe. Shortly thereafter, on December 25, 1891, Pete Anderson was killed by cattle rustlers east of Choctaw. Various accounts of the incident differ somewhat, but the description of the tragedy as told by Elizabeth (Anderson) Madole (niece of Pete and grandmother of William Madole) states that Pete was working for the government as a lawman when he discovered, by accident, some men butchering cattle. They were rustlers. They didn't want to be discovered, so they shot Pete off his horse, killing him instantly. After Pete's death, John Anderson worked for the tribe for a number of years in connection with the allotment process.

About:

“Everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. 
​This is the Indian theory of existence.” Hum-isha-ma (Mourning Dove - Christal Quintasket) Okanogan 1888-1936
"We Sioux spend a lot of time thinking about everyday things which in our minds are mixed up with the spiritual. We see in the world around us many symbols that teach us the meaning of life. We have a saying that the white man sees so little, he must see with only one eye. We see a lot that you no longer notice. You could notice if you wanted to, but you are usually too busy. We Indians live in a world of symbols and images where the spiritual and commonplace are one...We try to understand them not with the head but with the heart"
​Tȟáȟča Hušté (John Fire Lame Deer) Mineconju-Lakota 1903 - 1975
“Children were encouraged to develop strict discipline and a high regard for sharing. 
​When a girl picked her first berries and dug her first roots, they were given away to an elder so she would share her future success. When a child carried water for the home, an elder would give compliments, pretending to taste meat in water carried by a boy or berries in that of a girl. The child was encouraged not to be lazy and to grow straight.”
Hum-isha-ma (Mourning Dove - Christal Quintasket) Okanogan 1888-1936

John Charles Anderson Jr. and brother George with their famalies

Thomas Harden  Age 15

Mary (Anderson) Bourbannais           Antoine Bourbannais   

John Charles Anderson

An advertisement in the 1844 Peoria city directory slates, "Plow Manufactory: The subscribers respectfully announce to the Citizens of Peoria and the adjoining counties, that they are constantly engaged in mak.ing of various sizes and most approved models, which they beheve will bear a favorable comparison with any manufactured in the western country. For strength, durability, lightness of draft, and perfect finish in workmanship, they are unequaled, and are warranted to scour in any soil, after receiving a soil polish. We shall spare no effort to please those who may favor us with a call, and if we have not the article they may wish, we can get it up at short notice." Tobey &: Anderson, Peoria; May 1, 1844. By the time of John Anderson's death, many Potawatomi families had been removed to near Council Bluffs, Iowa as a result of the U.S. Government's removal policy of the 1820's and 30's. The government established an agency at Council Bluffs in April, 1837 and by August of that year approximately 1,450 persons, led by Billy Caldwell, had resettled in Iowa. 

Antoine and Archange Ouilmette came to Council Bluffs in 1838 from Chicago and both died there; Archange in 1840 and Antoine in 1841. ​Their son, Joseph lived at Council Bluffs until 1844 when he moved again to Maple Hill, Kansas. Their daughter, Archange (Wilmette) Tremblay also lived at Council Bluffs for a time as did the widow Mary (Trombly) Anderson and the three Anderson children. Mary died at Council Bluffs in 1848. Margaret LaFramboise, daughter of Claude and Shawwenoquah, also lived in Iowa and had at least four of her seven children there (Elizabeth, Davis, Thomas and Julia). Margaret LaFramboise earlier had married John Hardin, of Missouri, on September 8, 1842. John Hardin was born October 17, 1815 and was the second child of Davis Hardin (born April 5, 1784) and Elizabeth Simpson (born October 17, 1788). The other children of John and Elizabeth (Simpson) Hardin were: Elizabeth Williams (born 1812), Richard Simpson (born 1817), John Allen (born 1819), Henrietta Harris (born 1821), Rosannah Jane (born 1825) and Martin Davis (born 1826).John and Margaret (LaFramboise) Hardin lived at Council Bluffs until about 1860 when they moved to the Silver Lake, Kansas area. 

​Some other members of Hardin families who were early residents of the area stayed in Council Bluffs after most of the tribe had been removed again to Kansas. One of them, William D. Hardin, born October, 1856, in Council Bluffs and educated there, eventually became the City Assessor in 1890.  

In 1896 he wrote to his cousin Davis Hardin in Oklahoma Territory:  
Council Bluffs, Iowa, Jan 14 1896
Mr. Davis Hardin Shawnee Okla.
Dear Sir: I am going to try to visit you the last of this or 1st of next month - is there any law against shooting Quail in your country in January or Feb? Was down in Missouri about two weeks ago to see Uncle Dick (your father’s brother). He is past 81 and in good health.
Yours Truly, 
W.O. Hardin

The agency at Council Bluffs, Iowa was eventually closed in 1848. Earlier, in 1846, a treaty was effected resulting in a new reservation for the tribe near Silver Lake, Kansas. In the spring of 1847, Joseph LaFramboise (born 1798) was among the first of a group to remove to the Silver Lake, Kansas area. Joseph and his wife, Therese, had a large family and built a house on the highest point of ground on the east bank of Silver Lake. In one article, Joseph reportedly had two wives and eighteen children. As a result of previous treaties with the U.S. he also received annual annuities for himself and his children. One of his daughters, Monique, recalled: "We had plenty of money and plenty of fun."

​The Anderson children arrived at Silver Lake, Kansas in about 1851, making the trip from Council Bluffs, Iowa with their grandmother, Archange (Wilmette) Trombly. Shortly thereafter, John was sent to school in Missouri, to a place about three miles from Westport, Missouri. He had first attended a district school in the neighborhood of the reservation at Council Bluffs. John remained at school in Missouri for about five years then left to learn the blacksmith trade at Westport. He worked there for about two-and-a-half years for board and a few new clothes, then eventually went back to Silver Lake in about 1858 and in 1862 married Elizabeth Hardin. John's brother Peter later married Elizabeth's sister Julia (age 16) on July 3, 1871 at Shawnee County, Kansas, shortly before coming to Indian Territory. Later, John was involved in tribal business and also worked as a blacksmith in Kansas. 

Elizabeth (Anderson) Kremenak (granddaughter of John Anderson) recalls spending many hours listening to her grandpa tell of his experiences as a boy. During the Civil War he was a blacksmith and took care of the mules that pulled the cannons for the military. He also told her about how hard it was to get food for the mules and the Army during the war.

In 1854, Madore B. Beaubien settled at Silver Lake and worked as a merchant and trader there. He was married to Therese Hardin LaFramboise (daughter of Joseph LaFramboise) on June 1, 1854. 1t was in the Baptist Mission. Therese had earlier been married to Allen Hardin and still earlier, David Watkins of Chicago. At her Chicago wedding, the following account was given: ''The ceremony was performed by Rev. Isaac W. Hallam, pastor of the St. James Episcopal Church of this city. Everything was high-toned, well worthy of an Indian chief's daughter. The house was of no use, as it was full and surrounded with people. This wedding made a strong impression on my mind, as it was the first time I ever saw the Indian war-dance. Some of the guests not only had their tomahawks and scalping knives, bows and arrows, but a few of them had real scalps which they pretended they had taken in battle.  The various Indians had their faces decorated with all the favorite pictures of the Indians, and some of our young white men and ladies played the part of the Indians so well that it was difficult to distinguish them from real ones."

​In Kansas, the California and Oregon Trail joined the military road from Ft. Leavenworth just a little east of Silver Lake, passing through as great highway north of the Kansas River, making this location particularly desirable. Also, according to Potawatomi historian, Dr. R. David Edmunds, another reason that this area was so desirable was that the Potawatomi women were widely known as "knockouts", i.e. beautiful.

There was a lot of travel through this area and several ferries on the Kaw or Kansas River were operated by members of the Agee family: John, Joseph and Lewis. The Kennedy family was also prominent in the Silver Lake area and at nearby Uniontown where one of the Kennedy's, along with Mr. Freeman, built a ferryboat in 1852 that was operated by Sidney W. Smith. Joseph Wilmette operated a ferry in the area for some time and also freighted wheat to Topeka. 

Roy Charles Wilmette (grandson of Joseph Wilmette) tells a story of how, when on the way home from freighting in western Kansas, Joseph and three other men were caught in a blizzard. Eventually forced to stop, Joseph said he knew of an Indian camp where they could seek shelter, but only one of the men was willing to go with him. Climbing over a bank, Joseph yelled out and an Indian answered, leading them to the camp. After a day or so the two men left the camp and returned to their wagons only to find that the two men left behind had burned the wagons for warmth - and had frozen to death in spite of their efforts.

By 1860, many of the tribal members desired that the thirty square mile reservation in Kansas be allotted to members of the tribe. Madore B. Beaubien was an interpreter and one of six commissioners appointed by the tribe and approved by the U.S. Government. Under two treaties dictated by railroad interests, the reservation was divided up. The "Mission Indians" around St. Mary's took their share in individual allotments and later become known as the "Citizen Band." The "Prairie Band" was allowed a nine mile square tract in the northeast comer of the old reservation. However, the allotment procedure was riddled with fraud and graft against the tribe and by the end of the 1860's most of the Potawatomi around St. Mary's had been cheated out of their farms. In an 1863 government report on the allotments from Special Commissioners Edward Wolcoll and W. W. Ross to Hon. Wm. P. Dole, the Commissioners stated:  "After the allotments were completed we delayed, in pursuance of verbal instructions from you, making our report, in order to give an opportunity to as many as wished to do so, to give up their allotments and remove to Indian Country, in accordance with the terms of a treaty which the Agent of this tribe is now endeavoring to negotiate with them. Should the effort to negotiate a treaty with this tribe, by which a portion of them agree to remove to the Indian Country, be successful, it is not doubted by us that a considerable number of those who have taken lands in severalty will give up their allotments and go with their brethren. With this view, it seems to us advisable to defer for a time, the issuing of certificates for the allotments herewith reported."

In all, about 1,400 persons were allotted lands in Kansas in 1863. The Andersons, Hardins, Wilmettes, LaFromboises and Bourbonnais were among the families allotted lands in Kansas. Some of those named with special notations included Me-yain-co (chief), We-we-say (chief), Joseph LaFramboise (chief), George L. Young (headman), John F. Tipton (headman) and Ma-zhe (chief).

By 1871 the first of the Potawatomi families had arrived in Indian Territory. Among the first families were the three Andersons and their spouses; Pete and Julia (Hardin) Anderson, John and Elizabeth (Hardin) Anderson and Antoine and Mary (Anderson) Bourbonnais. In Indian Territory, Mary and her husband worked closely with Rev. Franklin Elliot of the Society of Friends at the Shawnee Mission and Mary was the first Sunday School Superintendent in the county, from 1873 until 1900. Antoine, along with George Pettifer, served as Trustee for the Clardyville School. 

The Bourbonnais had five children:  Aaron F. (born about 1862, Kansas), John A., Leve A., Ozella (wife of W. F. Jenks) and Amelia Hudson. Other early inhabitants of the new reservation included Jacob and Sophia (Vieux) Johnson. Jacob and Sophia were married on June 9, 1856 at Indianola, Shawnee County, Kansas. They built a two room log cabin at Pleasant Prairie near the present location of Wanelle Cemetery. Jacob and Sophia had a daughter, Rachel, who married John Wall. Rachel and John's daughter, Sadie, later married David (?) Hardin. Joshua E. Clardy, merchant, was also among the first seven families to arrive at Indian Territory, however, he returned to Kansas in 1876.

One story states that in the spring of 1876, an Indian outlaw attempted to rob Clardy at his store, located south of present Wanelle. Clardy resisted, and a fierce battle ensued. During the fight, Clardy finally killed his antagonist with his hunting knife, although suffering multiple wounds to himself from a similar weapon. Shortly thereafter, he returned to Kansas to become a newspaperman and in 1879 was the owner of the "Pottawatomi Chief" at St. Mary's Kansas and the "Kansas Agriculturist" at Wamego, Kansas. 

Davis Harden arrived in Indian Territory after 1875 and along with Pete and John Anderson, Thomas Hardin and many others, was active in Potawatomi business mailers. As tribal secretary for some time, Davis Hardin was involved in matters including legal claims against the government which were apparently being pursued in 1889 according to a deposition stating: "...Alexander B. Peltier and Davis Hardin who, being first duly sworn according to law, disposes and says, each for himself, that they are the identical persons who by authority of a Council of the Citizen Band Potawatomie Indians held October 23, 1889, executed an instrument of writing authorizing and empowering Anthony F. Navarre to present and prosecute certain claims of said Indians against the Government of the United States, as therein set forth, that the time agreed upon for said instrument of writing to run was five years from the date thereof, and that it was so set out therein before the same was signed executed and acknowledged by us."

Also in 1889, Charles D. Anderson (born 1863, Kansas) who was the oldest son of John and Elizabeth, married Anna Marie Mueller on July 1, 1889 at the home of his parents in Shawnee. Anna Marie Mueller was the daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth (Lang) Mueller and was born in Gieslitz, Germany on February 25. 1870. In 1883 she came to America with a family by the name of Steuber and they made their home in Wichita, Kansas. She stayed with the Steuber family for some time and later in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Greifenstein of Wichita. 

Charles and Anna Marie (Mueller) Anderson eventually had seven children, all born near Shawnee:
Fred Charles (1890 my grandfather), Herman Edward (1892), Osie (1894), Charles Henry (1897), Joseph John (1901), Marie Louise (1904) and Sophie Esther (1907).

​In 1891, lands were allotted in Oklahoma to members of the tribe. Shortly thereafter, on December 25, 1891, Pete Anderson was killed by cattle rustlers east of Choctaw. Various accounts of the incident differ somewhat, but the description of the tragedy as told by Elizabeth (Anderson) Madole (niece of Pete and grandmother of William Madole) states that Pete was working for the government as a lawman when he discovered, by accident, some men butchering cattle. They were rustlers. They didn't want to be discovered, so they shot Pete off his horse, killing him instantly. After Pete's death, John Anderson worked for the tribe for a number of years in connection with the allotment process.
Later, in the mid 1830's,Mary Trombly married John Anderson and they eventually had three children: John Charles (born 12/24/ 1837), Mary Ann (born 4/1/40 and Peter (1845). The identity of the correct John Anderson has not been determined absolutely as of the date of this writing. In one reference, John Anderson is said to have been born in New Orleans, Louisiana and came to Peoria in the early 1830's. 

Additionally, "A History of the State of Oklahoma" states that Mary Ann was born in New Orleans while her parents were on a visit there. Another reference states that john Anderson was from Kentucky but came to Peoria in the 1830's more recently from Indiana.  George Edward Anderson tells a family story of John Anderson coming originally from Sweden and later being adopted into the tribe after a ceremony of "crossing wrists" with a Potawatomi chief. Part of the difficulty in determining the correct John Anderson is that there are various references to John Anderson during the 1830's and 1840's in the same general location, i.e., Peoria County, the town of Peoria and the town of Chicago. According to the 1843 and 1844 Chicago directories there is a John Anderson "proprietor" at Washington Hall and in the 1845-46 edition John Anderson is shown as running a boarding house on Dearborn between Madison and Monroe streets.

There is no John listed in the 1839 editions, a year after his son John was born. There is however a John Anderson of Chicago in the 1846-47 city directory listing his occupation as blacksmith, the same trade that his son john would later pursue. There is no John Anderson listed in the 1847-48 Chicago directory, but there is one listed in the 1848-49 and 1849-50 editions, listing his occupation as wagon-maker. The John Anderson of Peoria is also described as a common blacksmith upon his arrival in Peoria. I have received more information regarding the John Anderson of Peoria than any of the others though the fact that he is the correct John has not been absolutely determined.


​John and Mary (Trombly) Anderson's second son Peter was born in about 1845 and John the father died several years later in (1847 being the most often cited date). However, john Anderson of OrIa is shown on an 1850 census in Peoria. The John Anderson at Peoria is listed on an 1840 list of delinquent taxes in Peoria, Illinois as the patentee owing the "Ills Land Co:' for "ne 6 (1 in 6e)." By 1844 this John Anderson household was located at block 4 of Fulton Street between Washington and Water. Also living at block 4 was Bathsheba Anderson "widow". John Anderson's financial position eventually improved because about 1843 he became a partner in a plow venture with William Tobey, who had arrived in Peona at (now Brimfield) in 1838. According to the "History of Peona" Tobey had been a wagon or carriage maker from New England and John Anderson was a blacksmith. Their business went by the name of Tobey & Anderson and was located on Fulton Street between Washington and Adams on the river.

In 1755, a French Canadian named Louis Chevalier established a trading post on the Saint Joseph River near Lake Michigan in the far southwest corner of the present day state of Michigan. Chevalier married a Potawatomi woman who went by the name of Mary Magdalene Reaume and they lived among the Potawatomi in the Saint Joseph area until 1780. Chevalier and his wife were the parents a son, Francis or Francois /Chovanier/Shobonnier who eventually rose to prominence within the tnbe and was the chief of a village bearing his name, "Shobonnier" located at the mouth of the Calumet River in Indiana. Francis married the daughter of Neebosh (Mary Ann) and they were the parents of Archange Chevalier. (Records from the Potawatomi tribal offices reflect a genealogy chart showing Archange Chevier as a full blood Potawatomi and the daughter of Francis Chevier, Chovanier or Shovinicr. On October 20, 1832 at the Treaty of Camp Tippecanoe (Indiana) gathering, "Francois Chovanier" was one of 61 Potawatomi signatories.  At the infamous Treaty of Chicago, September 26, 1833, "Sho-bon-nier" is among the 77 Potawatomi chiefs and headmen listed as signatories.)

​In 1790, Antoine Ouilmette (Wilmette), a French trader, settled at the mouth of the Chicago River and in 1796 married Archange, daughter of Shobonnier. Antoine was born at Landrayh, near Montreal and was a trader and voyager employed by the American Fur Company in the early days of Chicago. Antoine and Archange Ouilmette eventually had eight children.

​To the northwest of Chicago, near the site of modern Milwaukee, traders Jacques Viveau, Alexander and Francis LaFramboise and Antoine LeClair sold goods to Potawatomis, Winnebagos and Menominees. Viveau and LeClair were married to Potawatomi women. Francis LaFramboise was married to an Ottawa woman called Madeline or Madame and was later murdered by a Winnebago named White Ox at a trading house he had established in central Wisconsin. Traders from the area of the St. Joseph Valley included Joseph Bertrand and William Burnett. Burnett established a trading post and warehouse near the mouth of the St. Joseph River and married Kakima, daughter of Potawatomi chief Nanaquiba. Burnett's son, Abraham, later became prominent within the tribe during the mid 1800's. In 1803, Captain Whistler arrived at Chicago to build the first Fort Dearborn on a small tract of land on the north bank of the Chicago River that had been ceded at the Treaty of Greenville in 1795. When the troops came to Chicago they found four huts on the north bank of the river, one of them belonging to Antoine Ouilmette. Ouilmette's chief dependence for Iivelyhood, was the transportation of travelers and their baggage. On June 14, 1806, Ouilmette was charged by John Kinzie for the hire of a wagon and oxen to transport a trader's goods to the forks of the Illinois River. Mr. Kinzie was a Chicago trader and, in 1806, also sold such items as: tobacco at .50 cents a pound, whiskey at 50 cents a quart, powder at $1.50 a pound and shot at 33 cents a pound.

​In the summer of 1820, a traveler named John Tanner passed through Chicago with his family, going by canoe to St. Louis. In Tanner's narrative, he recounted how his progress was hailed by the low state of water in the Illinois River. During this time he suffered greatly from illness and destitution. He was rescued from his plight by Antoine Ouilmette, who had been able to carry some boats across the portage. Although his horses were gravely worn from their long journey, he agreed, for a moderate price, to transport Tanner and his canoe 60 miles - and if his horses should hold out, twice the distance or the length of the portage at this stage of the river. In addition he lent Tanner, who was weak from illness, a young horse to ride. Before 60 miles had been traversed, Ouilmette was himself taken sick, and as there was now some water in the river, Tanner dismissed him and attempted to descend the river in his canoe.


​Ouilmette's name also appears prominently in accounts of the Fort Dearborn Massacre of August 15, 1812. During the massacre Black Partridge, Wabaunsee, Keepotah and Billy Caldwell (Sauganash) protected the family of John Kinzie and Margaret Helm (Kinzie's stepdaughter) and eventually hid Mrs. Helm at Ouilmette's hut. Mrs. Helm reportedly hid in the house under a large featherbed as Archange Ouilmette's sister, Mrs. Bisson, sat on the bed sorting and arranging a patchwork quilt. Young Potawatomi braves searched the house but did not detect Mrs. Helm. The Fort quartermaster - Sergeant William Griffith - also hid out at the Ouilmette place, taking refuge in the garden behind some currant bushes. The family stripped him of his uniform and dressed him in a suit of deer skin, with bell, moccasins and pipe, like a French trader, and helped him escape out of Chicago with the Kinzies. It is said that, after the massacre, Ouilmette was the only white inhabitant of Chicago and was held in high regard by' members of the tribe.


​When troops arrived at Chicago in 1816 to build the second Fort Dearborn, he and his family were living there alone with the half-breed chief Alexander Robinson (Chechepinquay). Ouilmette and Robinson cultivated the field formerly used as the garden of the fort, raising good crops of corn. The crop of 1816 was sold to Captain Bradley after his arrival to rebuild the fort and they were also engaged by the soldiers to harrow the ground for a vegetable garden. Not everyone had a high opinion of Ouilmette, however, and Moses Morgan, who was employed in the construction of the second fort, described his appearance as that of a "medium sized half-starved Indian."


​Claude LaFramboise (born about 1795) was employed by the American Fur Company as a boatman and was engaged at Mackinac on July 16, 1819 for one year at a salary of $1,000. Madame LaFramboise was also engaged by the company in 1818 as a trader at Mackinac for an annual salary of $500. Among others employed by the American Fur Company around this time were several members of the Bourassa family. Claude LaFramboise was later married to a Potawatomi woman, possibly Shawwenoquah, and they had at least one daughter, Margaret, who was born in 1825. Claude was also mentioned in the book "Waubun" in a story involving a young Potawatomi boy, Tomah, who was going with trader Kinzie to Fort Winnebago and civilization for the first time: ''Tomah had been equipped in jacket and trousers, with the other articles of apparel necessary to his new sphere and character. They were near Aux Plaines, and approaching the residence of Glode (Claude) LaFramboise, where Tomah knew he should meet acquaintances. He asked leave to get out of the wagon and walk a little way. When the gentlemen next saw him he was in full Potawatomi costume. Although it was bitter winter weather, he had put on his native garb rather than show himself to his old friends in a state of transformation." The town of Chicago gradually became an important trading village and in 1825 the assessment roll of John L. Bogardus, assessor of Peoria County, shows fourteen taxpayers in Chicago. By 1826, near Chicago, at an area called Hardscrabble, there were five or six cabins, several of which were occupied by LaFramboise families. 


In 1830, the Federal Census listed among others the Antoine Wilmette household at ten persons, Joseph LaFramboise with seven and Glowed LaFramboise with four. Also, in another document, many of the mixed-blood leaders of the tribe were included in a "petition of the Catholics of Chicago to Bishop Rosati of St. Louis for a resident priest" dated April 16, 1833. Also among the early inhabitants of Peoria County (which included Chicago in the early days) was Toussaint or Tousan Tremblay, originally from Montreal, the son of Eileen and Appoline (laVoie) Tremblay. Toussaint Tremblay may possibly be the same person as the ''Turano Tremble" aged 88, listed on the 1863 Kansas allotment roll and indicating he was born in about 1775. Toussaint Tremblay married Archange Wilmette in 1813 at Cahokia and they became the parents of daughter Mary (Marie), and son Lewis.


​On an 1818 Illinois census there is a ''Toussaint Trombler" listed with a household consisting of "I free male, 21 and over': and two other family members (presumably wife Archange and one of the children). However, the marriage of Toussaint and Archange did not survive and they were divorced on June 8, 1830. Toussaint was not present at the divorce hearing. Less than two months after the divorce, on August 3, 1830, Archange Tremblay apparently remarried Mr. John? Mann.


​While these families were in the Chicago area, the area near Peoria, Illinois was another location of the Potawatomi. As early as 1790 Lagesse and other Potawatomis established villages near the northern shores of Lake Peoria. In 1812 one estimate shows a population of approximately 125 m what is now Peoria. According to ''The History of Peoria", among the early inhabitants near Peoria were Antoine LeClair, Antoine Bourbonnais and the old French trader Bisson (pronounced Besaw) who lived at Wesley.

My Ancestors

About:

In 1755, a French Canadian named Louis Chevalier established a trading post on the Saint Joseph River near Lake Michigan in the far southwest corner of the present day state of Michigan. Chevalier married a Potawatomi woman who went by the name of Mary Magdalene Reaume and they lived among the Potawatomi in the Saint Joseph area until 1780. Chevalier and his wife were the parents a son, Francis or Francois /Chovanier/Shobonnier who eventually rose to prominence within the tnbe and was the chief of a village bearing his name, "Shobonnier" located at the mouth of the Calumet River in Indiana. Francis married the daughter of Neebosh (Mary Ann) and they were the parents of Archange Chevalier. (Records from the Potawatomi tribal offices reflect a genealogy chart showing Archange Chevier as a full blood Potawatomi and the daughter of Francis Chevier, Chovanier or Shovinicr. On October 20, 1832 at the Treaty of Camp Tippecanoe (Indiana) gathering, "Francois Chovanier" was one of 61 Potawatomi signatories.  At the infamous Treaty of Chicago, September 26, 1833, "Sho-bon-nier" is among the 77 Potawatomi chiefs and headmen listed as signatories.)

​In 1790, Antoine Ouilmette (Wilmette), a French trader, settled at the mouth of the Chicago River and in 1796 married Archange, daughter of Shobonnier. Antoine was born at Landrayh, near Montreal and was a trader and voyager employed by the American Fur Company in the early days of Chicago. Antoine and Archange Ouilmette eventually had eight children.

​To the northwest of Chicago, near the site of modern Milwaukee, traders Jacques Viveau, Alexander and Francis LaFramboise and Antoine LeClair sold goods to Potawatomis, Winnebagos and Menominees. Viveau and LeClair were married to Potawatomi women. Francis LaFramboise was married to an Ottawa woman called Madeline or Madame and was later murdered by a Winnebago named White Ox at a trading house he had established in central Wisconsin. Traders from the area of the St. Joseph Valley included Joseph Bertrand and William Burnett. Burnett established a trading post and warehouse near the mouth of the St. Joseph River and married Kakima, daughter of Potawatomi chief Nanaquiba. Burnett's son, Abraham, later became prominent within the tribe during the mid 1800's. In 1803, Captain Whistler arrived at Chicago to build the first Fort Dearborn on a small tract of land on the north bank of the Chicago River that had been ceded at the Treaty of Greenville in 1795. When the troops came to Chicago they found four huts on the north bank of the river, one of them belonging to Antoine Ouilmette. Ouilmette's chief dependence for Iivelyhood, was the transportation of travelers and their baggage. On June 14, 1806, Ouilmette was charged by John Kinzie for the hire of a wagon and oxen to transport a trader's goods to the forks of the Illinois River. Mr. Kinzie was a Chicago trader and, in 1806, also sold such items as: tobacco at .50 cents a pound, whiskey at 50 cents a quart, powder at $1.50 a pound and shot at 33 cents a pound.

​In the summer of 1820, a traveler named John Tanner passed through Chicago with his family, going by canoe to St. Louis. In Tanner's narrative, he recounted how his progress was hailed by the low state of water in the Illinois River. During this time he suffered greatly from illness and destitution. He was rescued from his plight by Antoine Ouilmette, who had been able to carry some boats across the portage. Although his horses were gravely worn from their long journey, he agreed, for a moderate price, to transport Tanner and his canoe 60 miles - and if his horses should hold out, twice the distance or the length of the portage at this stage of the river. In addition he lent Tanner, who was weak from illness, a young horse to ride. Before 60 miles had been traversed, Ouilmette was himself taken sick, and as there was now some water in the river, Tanner dismissed him and attempted to descend the river in his canoe.


​Ouilmette's name also appears prominently in accounts of the Fort Dearborn Massacre of August 15, 1812. During the massacre Black Partridge, Wabaunsee, Keepotah and Billy Caldwell (Sauganash) protected the family of John Kinzie and Margaret Helm (Kinzie's stepdaughter) and eventually hid Mrs. Helm at Ouilmette's hut. Mrs. Helm reportedly hid in the house under a large featherbed as Archange Ouilmette's sister, Mrs. Bisson, sat on the bed sorting and arranging a patchwork quilt. Young Potawatomi braves searched the house but did not detect Mrs. Helm. The Fort quartermaster - Sergeant William Griffith - also hid out at the Ouilmette place, taking refuge in the garden behind some currant bushes. The family stripped him of his uniform and dressed him in a suit of deer skin, with bell, moccasins and pipe, like a French trader, and helped him escape out of Chicago with the Kinzies. It is said that, after the massacre, Ouilmette was the only white inhabitant of Chicago and was held in high regard by' members of the tribe.


​When troops arrived at Chicago in 1816 to build the second Fort Dearborn, he and his family were living there alone with the half-breed chief Alexander Robinson (Chechepinquay). Ouilmette and Robinson cultivated the field formerly used as the garden of the fort, raising good crops of corn. The crop of 1816 was sold to Captain Bradley after his arrival to rebuild the fort and they were also engaged by the soldiers to harrow the ground for a vegetable garden. Not everyone had a high opinion of Ouilmette, however, and Moses Morgan, who was employed in the construction of the second fort, described his appearance as that of a "medium sized half-starved Indian."


​Claude LaFramboise (born about 1795) was employed by the American Fur Company as a boatman and was engaged at Mackinac on July 16, 1819 for one year at a salary of $1,000. Madame LaFramboise was also engaged by the company in 1818 as a trader at Mackinac for an annual salary of $500. Among others employed by the American Fur Company around this time were several members of the Bourassa family. Claude LaFramboise was later married to a Potawatomi woman, possibly Shawwenoquah, and they had at least one daughter, Margaret, who was born in 1825. Claude was also mentioned in the book "Waubun" in a story involving a young Potawatomi boy, Tomah, who was going with trader Kinzie to Fort Winnebago and civilization for the first time: ''Tomah had been equipped in jacket and trousers, with the other articles of apparel necessary to his new sphere and character. They were near Aux Plaines, and approaching the residence of Glode (Claude) LaFramboise, where Tomah knew he should meet acquaintances. He asked leave to get out of the wagon and walk a little way. When the gentlemen next saw him he was in full Potawatomi costume. Although it was bitter winter weather, he had put on his native garb rather than show himself to his old friends in a state of transformation." The town of Chicago gradually became an important trading village and in 1825 the assessment roll of John L. Bogardus, assessor of Peoria County, shows fourteen taxpayers in Chicago. By 1826, near Chicago, at an area called Hardscrabble, there were five or six cabins, several of which were occupied by LaFramboise families. 


In 1830, the Federal Census listed among others the Antoine Wilmette household at ten persons, Joseph LaFramboise with seven and Glowed LaFramboise with four. Also, in another document, many of the mixed-blood leaders of the tribe were included in a "petition of the Catholics of Chicago to Bishop Rosati of St. Louis for a resident priest" dated April 16, 1833. Also among the early inhabitants of Peoria County (which included Chicago in the early days) was Toussaint or Tousan Tremblay, originally from Montreal, the son of Eileen and Appoline (laVoie) Tremblay. Toussaint Tremblay may possibly be the same person as the ''Turano Tremble" aged 88, listed on the 1863 Kansas allotment roll and indicating he was born in about 1775. Toussaint Tremblay married Archange Wilmette in 1813 at Cahokia and they became the parents of daughter Mary (Marie), and son Lewis.


​On an 1818 Illinois census there is a ''Toussaint Trombler" listed with a household consisting of "I free male, 21 and over': and two other family members (presumably wife Archange and one of the children). However, the marriage of Toussaint and Archange did not survive and they were divorced on June 8, 1830. Toussaint was not present at the divorce hearing. Less than two months after the divorce, on August 3, 1830, Archange Tremblay apparently remarried Mr. John? Mann.


​While these families were in the Chicago area, the area near Peoria, Illinois was another location of the Potawatomi. As early as 1790 Lagesse and other Potawatomis established villages near the northern shores of Lake Peoria. In 1812 one estimate shows a population of approximately 125 m what is now Peoria. According to ''The History of Peoria", among the early inhabitants near Peoria were Antoine LeClair, Antoine Bourbonnais and the old French trader Bisson (pronounced Besaw) who lived at Wesley.

My Ancestors

Chris Anderson (aka Onefeather) Guidance with Spirituality and Health
has been a spiritual advisor, working with spirituality and health with the Tarot and Astrology since 1970. Possessing a foundation in Jungian psychology and having been initiated in mystical Native American methodologies by his grandfather during his youth (a full blood Potawatomi), Onefeather nurtures and supports his clients on both the physical realm as well as the metaphysical. It is his intention to align the seeker's earthly journey with their spiritual unfolding... so that the individual attains understanding and success in the most effortless way. Chris is sensitive to the influences of both the past and future life objectives of the evolving soul and helps the client to get an overview of where one’s destiny lays, bringing vision and insight to the current conditions in one’s life. Addressing energy blockage, misdirected effort and attachments to the past that are creating an impasse in the current theme of a person’s life, Onefeather offers his wisdom and objective vision, often with immediately liberating outcome. In addition, Chris brings both meditation and affirmative prayer to the work and supports his client in realms other than just mundane information seeking. He also has facilitated vision quests and naming ceremonies for those who would like to embrace the Native American spiritual ethic, and offers insight in relation to the Universal Awakening that mankind is on the threshold of now experiencing... the arrival of the 8th Fire.

Onefeather Journal

John Charles Anderson Jr. and brother George with their famalies

Thomas Harden  Age 15

Onefeather Journal

“Implicitly or explicitly, the rhythms of our lives, the movement from season to season, the patterns of the winds, and the pulse of the tides all depend on the apparent motions of the sun and moon and stars. Yet most modern urban dwellers are only dimly aware of the night sky ― the stars and their myriad forms. They are only slightly more aware of the phases of the moon or the motions of the sun. Even those who take the daily horoscope seriously generally have a very poor notion of its connection with astronomical phenomena.”
Ray A. Williamson, Living the Sky: The Cosmos of the American Indian
Later, in the mid 1830's,Mary Trombly married John Anderson and they eventually had three children: John Charles (born 12/24/ 1837), Mary Ann (born 4/1/40 and Peter (1845). The identity of the correct John Anderson has not been determined absolutely as of the date of this writing. In one reference, John Anderson is said to have been born in New Orleans, Louisiana and came to Peoria in the early 1830's. 

Additionally, "A History of the State of Oklahoma" states that Mary Ann was born in New Orleans while her parents were on a visit there. Another reference states that john Anderson was from Kentucky but came to Peoria in the 1830's more recently from Indiana.  George Edward Anderson tells a family story of John Anderson coming originally from Sweden and later being adopted into the tribe after a ceremony of "crossing wrists" with a Potawatomi chief. Part of the difficulty in determining the correct John Anderson is that there are various references to John Anderson during the 1830's and 1840's in the same general location, i.e., Peoria County, the town of Peoria and the town of Chicago. According to the 1843 and 1844 Chicago directories there is a John Anderson "proprietor" at Washington Hall and in the 1845-46 edition John Anderson is shown as running a boarding house on Dearborn between Madison and Monroe streets.

There is no John listed in the 1839 editions, a year after his son John was born. There is however a John Anderson of Chicago in the 1846-47 city directory listing his occupation as blacksmith, the same trade that his son john would later pursue. There is no John Anderson listed in the 1847-48 Chicago directory, but there is one listed in the 1848-49 and 1849-50 editions, listing his occupation as wagon-maker. The John Anderson of Peoria is also described as a common blacksmith upon his arrival in Peoria. I have received more information regarding the John Anderson of Peoria than any of the others though the fact that he is the correct John has not been absolutely determined.


​John and Mary (Trombly) Anderson's second son Peter was born in about 1845 and John the father died several years later in (1847 being the most often cited date). However, john Anderson of OrIa is shown on an 1850 census in Peoria. The John Anderson at Peoria is listed on an 1840 list of delinquent taxes in Peoria, Illinois as the patentee owing the "Ills Land Co:' for "ne 6 (1 in 6e)." By 1844 this John Anderson household was located at block 4 of Fulton Street between Washington and Water. Also living at block 4 was Bathsheba Anderson "widow". John Anderson's financial position eventually improved because about 1843 he became a partner in a plow venture with William Tobey, who had arrived in Peona at (now Brimfield) in 1838. According to the "History of Peona" Tobey had been a wagon or carriage maker from New England and John Anderson was a blacksmith. Their business went by the name of Tobey & Anderson and was located on Fulton Street between Washington and Adams on the river.